Professor Carlos Caldas

Professor of Cancer Medicine, University of Cambridge

Professor Carlos Caldas

Professor of Cancer Medicine, University of Cambridge
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Biography

Carlos Caldas is Professor of Cancer Medicine, University of Cambridge, and Head, Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute. He is an Honorary Consultant Medical Oncologist and Breast Cancer Programme Director at the Cambridge Cancer Centre. He is Fellow of the Academy of the Medical Sciences, Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences, and EMBO Member. He received the 2016 ESMO Hamilton Fairley Award and holds an ERC Advanced Grant (2016-2021). He has published over 350 manuscripts, including in Nature, Cell, Cell Reports, New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine, Science Translational Medicine and Nature Communications.

His research focus is the functional genomics of breast cancer and its biological and clinical implications. His laboratory redefined the molecular taxonomy of breast cancer, revealing novel subtypes and their respective drivers [Curtis et al, Nature 2012; Dawson et al, EMBO J 2013; Pereira et al, Nature Communications 2016], robustly validated this new breast cancer molecular taxonomy [Ali et al, Genome Biology 2014], and showed recently that it determines the clinical trajectories of patients, including late relapses [Rueda et al, Nature 2019]. His group also completed miRNA profiling of 1,300 of the same tumors and this uncovered a new role for miRNAs as modulators of the immune response in a subset of breast cancers [Dvinge et al, Nature 2013]. He also co-led seminal studies that define the clonal heterogeneity of triple negative breast cancers [Shah et al, Nature 2012] and the patterns of whole-genome ER binding in primary tumors [Ross-Ines, Nature 2012]. His group led the studies that established ctDNA as a monitoring biomarker in breast cancer [Dawson et al, NEJM 2013] and as a liquid biopsy to unravel therapy resistance [Murtaza et al, Nature 2013; Murtaza el al, Nature Communications 2015]. More recently his laboratory has developed and pioneered the use of patient-derived tumor explants as a model system for breast cancer, in particular as a pre-clinical pharmacogenomics platform [Eirew et al, Nature 2015; Bruna et al, Cell 2016].

Sessions by Professor Carlos Caldas